About Radon Gas in Utah.

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  • Approximately 1 in 3 Utah homes have elevated levels of radon gas.
  • Nearly 1 in 15 homes in the U.S. have elevated levels of radon gas.
  • Radon is naturally occurring and is created from the radioactive decay of uranium in the soil.
  • The EPA estimates that radon gas causes approximately 21,000 lung cancer deaths in the U.S. each year.
  • The EPA recommends that you take action to reduce radon gas when levels are greater than 4 pCi/L.
  • The EPA estimates that second hand smoke causes approximately 3,000 lung cancer deaths in the U.S. each year.
  • A University of North Dakota suggests that radon may even contribute to Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease.
  • Radon gas is found all over the United States.
  • Radon Gas is found all over Utah.
  • RadoVent™ has worked on homes in Beaver Utah with radon gas levels above 300 pCi/L. That's 75 times the EPA recommendations.
  • In areas of Sandy, Draper and Park City over half the homes tested have high radon gas levels.
  • Approximately 32% Salt Lake County homes have elevated levels of radon gas.
  • Radon gas can easily and inexpensively be measured and controlled.
  • Radon enters the home or building through cracks and other openings in the foundations and floors.
  • Radon levels tend to be greater in the lowest areas of the home or building.
  • Many Utah homes have finished basements with sleeping rooms.
  • Radon gas levels can be lowered by up to 99% by installing an active radon mitigation system.
  • The RadoVent™ Radon Mitigation System works 24 hours a day to prevent elevated levels of radon gas.

More Utah Radon Gas Information:

RadoVent™ LLC 801-285-9255

www.radovent.com

Radon Gas Links and Information:

United States EPA Radon Information
World Health Organization Radon Information
State of Utah Radon Website
Utah Short Term Test Results by Zip Code

EPA Radon Risk.

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Radon LevelIf 1,000 people who smoked were exposed to this level over a lifetime*...The risk of cancer from radon exposure compares to**...WHAT TO DO:
Stop smoking and...      
20 pCi/L About 260 people could get lung cancer 250 times the risk of drowning Fix your home
10 pCi/L About 150 people could get lung cancer 200 times the risk of dying in a home fire Fix your home
8 pCi/L About 120 people could get lung cancer 30 times the risk of dying in a fall Fix your home
4 pCi/L About 62 people could get lung cancer 5 times the risk of dying in a car crash Fix your home
2 pCi/L About 32 people could get lung cancer 6 times the risk of dying from poison Consider fixing between 2 and 4 pCi/L
1.3 pCi/L About 20 people could get lung cancer (Average indoor radon level) (Reducing radon levels below 2 pci/L is difficult.)
0.4 pCi/L About 3 people could get lung cancer (Average outdoor radon level)  

Note: If you are a former smoker, your risk may be lower.

* Lifetime risk of lung cancer deaths from EPA Assessment of Risks from Radon in Homes (EPA 402-R-03-003).
** Comparison data calculated using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's 1999-2001 National Center for Injury Prevention and Control Reports.

Radon LevelIf 1,000 people who smoked were exposed to this level over a lifetime*...The risk of cancer from radon exposure compares to**...WHAT TO DO:
Stop smoking and...      
20 pCi/L About 36 people could get lung cancer 35 times the risk of drowning Fix your home
10 pCi/L About 18 people could get lung cancer 20 times the risk of dying in a home fire Fix your home
8 pCi/L About 15 people could get lung cancer 4 times the risk of dying in a fall Fix your home
4 pCi/L About 7 people could get lung cancer The risk of dying in a car crash Fix your home
  About 4 people could get lung cancer The risk of dying from poison Consider fixing between 2 and 4 pCi/L
1.3 pCi/L About 2 people could get lung cancer (Average indoor radon level) (Reducing radon levels below 2 pci/L is difficult.)
0.4 pCi/L   (Average outdoor radon level)