Radon Gas Blog

Can I sell my home if it has high radon levels?

Posted by Travis Jewell on Tue, Oct 25, 2011 @ 04:08 PM

While sitting down with the listing agent to discuss your options, reality sets in. The comps in the neighborhood are down, the furnace needs to be updated, the rooms have to be staged and your favorite cherry red accent wall needs to be repainted in a more “neutral” color. The fact is if you want your home to sell, the house has to appeal to a wide variety of prospective buyers.


Radon testing and radon mitigation are quickly becoming a common issue during real estate transactions. More and more citizens are being educated about the risks associated with radon gas. These radon-educated buyers are looking for a new home with low radon levels. Even if the buyers do not know about radon, many home inspectors offer radon testing as an option during the home inspection process and their clients choose this option often. A home with low or reduced radon levels will be more appealing to home buyers.

Homes with radon issues can be sold but homes with resolved radon issues are more sellable. Consider radon testing and radon mitigation as a part of preparing the home to be sold. I often recommend that listing agents advise their clients to test for and repair any radon issue before placing the house on the market. This can prevent any future roadblock or surprises that may occur after the home inspection. Imagine the scenario that most people fear about radon in real estate transactions:

After a seemingly endless parade of people looking through every room in your home for sometimes months on end you finally find a buyer who makes a decent offer which you have accepted. A few weeks go by and it’s time for the home inspection. Because of your diligence prior to listing the property the home inspector doesn’t find any major issues or visible problems with your house. But wait, the buyers have chosen to perform a radon test. The home inspector has found an invisible problem with your house. The radon test comes back showing that radon levels are three times what the EPA recommends. These buyers, having never heard about radon before, scour the Internet to find out that radon is the number one cause for lung cancer in non-smokers. Being health conscious people, your buyers refuse to live in a house that might cause lung cancer. The buyers are contemplating walking and canceling the contract.

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Tags: Radon Mitigation, Radon Lung Cancer, Radon Illinois, Radon Utah, Radon gas basement, effects of radon, radon system, radon test, radon contractor, radon measurement, Radon and real estate

A Quick Guide to Selecting a Radon Contractor

Posted by Travis Jewell on Tue, Sep 13, 2011 @ 01:49 PM

Radon testing and radon mitigation are highly specialized trades. Selecting the right radon contractor can possibly be a life or death decision. Radon gas is the second leading cause for lung cancer as it kills more than 20,000 people annually. High levels of radon can occur anywhere in the United States. Because radon is a serious and common issue, selecting the appropriate contractor is serious business. Here are six basic questions to help you select a good radon contractor.


6 Questions to ask yourself when selecting a radon contractor:


1.    Is the radon contractor licensed? There is not a national license for the radon trades. A client looking for a quality contractor should contact their State Radon Office to find out if there is a State specific radon contractors license. Many states do not have licensing programs for radon. If you live in one of these states, look to hire a radon contractor who is certified either by the National Environmental Health Association’s Radon Proficiency Program or by the National Radon Safety Board’s Certification Program.  It is also wise to ask if the installer/employee is licensed or certified. The company owner may have documents but the installers may be unskilled or inexperienced.
2.     Are they insured? Radon is risky business and radon mitigation systems sometimes require major alterations to the home. Make certain to check your contractor’s insurance certificate to be sure it has proper coverage and is up to date.
3.     What was your impression? Impressions are important and gut feelings can be a strong indicator. Did the contractor give you the impression that they truly care about what they do for a living? Were they presentable and respectful? In many cases if you had a bad first impression, you will likely have a bad last impression. A person’s demeanor can say a lot about the quality of their work.
4.     Did you get a firm price? Whenever dealing with any contractor it is important to agree to a firm price or written proposal before proceeding. Make sure the radon contractor provides a detailed scope of work and a contract before starting work. Do not pay money up front without a signed contract. If a radon contractor cannot provide a firm price to install a radon mitigation system it may indicate a lack of experience. An experienced radon contractor should know exactly the cost to install a radon mitigation system or perform a radon test.
5.     Do they provide a guarantee? The EPA recommends that radon levels be lowered below 4 picocuries per liter. Most quality radon mitigation contractors will provide a written guarantee of performance. Some contractors will have stronger warranties than others. A quality radon mitigation contractor should be able to install the radon remediation system with confidence that the radon levels will be lessened. If a contractor refuses to provide a performance warranty it may indicate a lack of quality and experience.
6.     Do they have references? Any good contractor will be more than willing to provide references to prospective clients. If a contractor side steps when you ask for references you may have to wonder what they are hiding. A past customer can provide you with details of how their experience with the contractor was. Ask the reference about cleanliness, quality, punctuality and overall satisfaction. Ask them if they have ever had any trouble contacting the contractor for service work after the job was completed. Checking references can be the strongest indicator of good versus bad radon contractors.

3 Final points when selecting a radon contractor:

•    Decisions shouldn’t always come down to price. A lower price can indicate low paid or unlicensed technicians and low quality parts. Too high of a price can indicate a lack of experience to quote correctly.
•    Radon gas is deadly. If you hire a radon measurement contractor who performs an incorrect test you could be living under false impressions. If you hire a bad radon mitigation contractor you may have a low quality radon system installed that doesn’t keep radon levels at bay.
•    It is important to question your radon contractor but if they are questionable people, you may want to keep shopping.

There are hundreds of good radon contractors throughout the country but as in every trade there are some bad ones. Recently a contractor in Colorado lost their license through falsifying radon test data and intimidating clients [ Bad Radon Contractor Colorado Story].  Don’t allow yourself to be subjected to low quality radon contractors, do you homework and you will find a contractor who will handle your radon testing or mitigation project with professionalism.

If you need help finding a quality radon contractor please feel free to contact us RadoVent™ Radon Mitigation Services.
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Tags: Radon Gas, Radon Mitigation, Radon Lung Cancer, Radon fix, Radon Illinois, Radon Utah, RadoVent, radon system, radon test, radon contractor, radon measurement, radon quote

Rental Properties and Radon Gas. Protect your Tenants.

Posted by Travis Jewell on Wed, Aug 17, 2011 @ 03:38 PM

Radon is not just a homowner's issue.

I have been away from my radon blog for the last few weeks as I have been working in the field on a large radon mitigation project. This project is a townhouse style, low-income apartment complex. While working on this project I spent some time thinking about how great it is that the management company who hired us is taking action to protect their tenants from the dangers of radon gas.

I don’t know the details of why they decided to test for radon gas. The laws do not require landlords to test their properties for
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Tags: Radon Gas, Radon Mitigation, Radon fix, Radon Illinois, Radon Utah, RadoVent, Radon gas basement, effects of radon, radon system, radon vent, radon entry behavior, Radon Testing

Passive radon systems. For better or for worse?

Posted by Travis Jewell on Fri, Jun 24, 2011 @ 04:36 PM

     Radon resistant new construction (RRNC) is quickly becoming a hot topic for new homes and buildings. Radon resistant new construction techniques control radon gas entry through the installation of a passive radon mitigation system. When installed correctly by a licensed radon contractor, passive radon systems can help to prevent radon gas entry without the use of a radon vent fan. These systems are more economical for consumers as the cost to install is typically less than retrofit applications and compared to active radon systems the electrical and heat energy savings are great. Many states, municipalities, contractors and architects are adopting radon resistant new construction codes and policies that are the correct procedure.

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Tags: Radon Gas, Radon Mitigation, Radon Lung Cancer, Radon fix, Radon Illinois, Radon Utah, RadoVent, Radon gas basement, effects of radon, radon system, radon attic system, radon vent

High radon levels? Should I Move?

Posted by Travis Jewell on Thu, Jun 16, 2011 @ 10:26 AM

It's a peaceful day in suburbia the sky is blue and the birds are chirping while the kids are playing in the yard. Enjoying the view you think how grateful you are of your beautiful new home. You notice the postman delivering the mail to your neighbors and make your way to the street to greet him. The postman hands you an envelope from the radon testing company, the results are in and the radon levels are surprisingly high! You look back at your new home and suddenly fear takes over, “how can this be?” “What do I do now?” “Do I have to move?”

You don’t have to move and even if you did, high radon levels can be found in any home. You can easily correct the problem through the installation of a radon mitigation system. Within 24 hours of a system installation, radon levels can be reduced by up to 99%. These soil gas ventilation systems can be hidden within the house and won't break the bank.

What’s the problem with radon?

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Tags: Radon Gas, Radon Mitigation, Radon Lung Cancer, Radon fix, Radon Illinois, Radon Utah, RadoVent, Radon gas basement, effects of radon, radon system, radon vent, radon entry behavior, Radon Testing

7 benefits of radon systems installed through the attic

Posted by Travis Jewell on Tue, May 31, 2011 @ 04:29 PM

Radon Mitigation Systems can be installed through the exterior of the house or hidden within attic. Both methods are effective to reduce radon gas levels in homes. Exterior installed radon systems are most common across the United States but there are several benefits to the attic installation.

Seven benefits of radon systems installed the the attic:


  1. Hidden radon system components. Rather than having the fan and vent pipes installed on the side of the house, the only visible exterior component is the vent stack rising through the roof similar to an existing plumbing stack.
  2. Radon fans are better protected from the elements. Radon systems create condensation within the suction and exhaust pipes. In cold environments, this condensation can freeze and effect the life of the radon vent fan. Radon fans inside attic spaces are better protected from the freeze and thaw cycle.
  3. Radon fans and electrical components are out of reach. When installed through the attic space, the radon fan and its electrical components are located within the attic. This location is more innaccessible to children who may turn the fan off or play with the system components.
  4. Quieter radon systems. Although radon systems installed through the exterior are quiet, installing the fan inside attic space can prevent all noticable system noise.
  5. System performance indication. Most attic installations are routed through the garage. This method allows the installer to place the system performance gauge right in the garage. Every time you enter your garage you can make certain that your radon system is on and pulling vacuum.
  6. Radon in real-estate. Many people with radon systems are concerned about the effect of the resale value of their home. A radon system installed through the attic is more appealing to potential buyers as it is not a noticable component on the outside of the house.
  7. Radon reintrainment. Having the vent stack opening above the roof of the house makes it possible for the radon contractor to get the radon system exhaust further away from doors, windows and other openings. This will minimize the possibility of radon re-entry into the home.
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Tags: Radon Mitigation, Radon fix, Radon Illinois, Radon Utah, RadoVent, radon system, radon attic system, radon vent

What’s that smell? It’s not radon gas.

Posted by Travis Jewell on Tue, May 17, 2011 @ 03:50 PM

     If there is a strange smell in your basement it may be musty odors from a moisture problem, a leaky gas pipe from a combustion appliance or just your teenagers gym socks. It is not radon gas. Radon gas is odorless, colorless, tasteless and radioactive.

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Tags: Radon Gas, Radon Mitigation, Radon Lung Cancer, Radon fix, Radon Illinois, Radon Utah, RadoVent, Radon gas basement, effects of radon, radon entry behavior, Radon Testing